A-Z Saltwater Fishing Terms For Beginners

Change Management for this List

  • Active fish – The fish that are feeding heavily at a certain time or area and are striking bait with more frequency
  • Albies – Albacore
  • Allison – 200+lb yellow-fin
  • Anal fin – Best described, to avoid any risk of offense, as being the fin closest to the tail on the belly of a fish
  • Anchor drift – when your anchor drags
  • Angler – Person whose occupation or recreation is to catch fish, angler is that one who catches fish with a hook
  • Angling – A term first penned by Isaac Walton (1593 ) Angling is the art or science of catching fish with hook, bait, line and fishing rod or pole
  • Angling permit – Fishing permit
  • Artificial bait – Synthetic bait that looks like, feels like and sometimes smells like the real thing
  • Artificial lures – Designed to imitate something a fish might want to eat, used for spinning, trolling and jigging
  • Attractant – Substance or anything else scented to attract the fish
  • Baby Killer – Someone who keeps small fish
  • Backing Down – Running the boat backwards to pursue a fish (in reverse)
  • Backlash – A loop of line trapped under successive coils on the spool of a multiplier reel caused by allowing the spool to overrun See also “Bird”s Nest”
  • Bag limit – Limited amount of fish allowance that the angler may keep, catch or retain per day, size, amount or weight
  • Bait – Live bait or artificial bait or anything attached to the fishing hook used to attract and catch the fish Some prefer to use artificial, plastic bait or electronic lures, but the traditional natural baits like shrimp or smaller bait fish, are more attractive to the fish Natural attractant added to a hook to catch fish bait includes live and dead baitfish, crabs, crayfish, worms, eels, insects, mussels, clams, cut bait (fish), chicken livers, corn kernels, dough balls, squid, and shrimp
  • Bait Ball – A densely packed shoal of baitfish just asking to get hit by predators
  • Bait Clip – A clip used by surf-casters to secure a baited hook close to the casting weight to prevent the bait flapping around during the cast It keeps your rig more aerodynamic allowing longer casts and preventing the bait from flying off during the cast
  • Bait Well – See “Livewell”
  • Baitcasting – Casting a lure with a multiplying or bait casting reel Fishing with a revolving spool and bait casting rod
  • Baitcasting reel – A small multiplier reel designed specifically for casting lures
  • Baitfish – Smaller fish that is used as bait for large size fish Some popular baitfish are pinfish, Spanish sardines, striped mullet, strip mojarra, silver jenny, the Atlantic croaker, yellow mackerel, blue runner, ballyhoo or balao, pig-fish, sand perch, sardines, and shrimp
  • Balao – Pronounced “bally-who”
  • Barelycuda – Small or short barracuda
  • Barney – Term used to describe an angler who claims know everything but can’t get hung
  • Beachcasting – Unsurprisingly, a fishing term meaning casting a lure, or more often a baited hook, from the beach See also surf-fishing
  • Belly Strip – A strip of belly meat from a baitfish Cut and trimmed in a streamlined fashion, it can be trolled behind the boat, where it flutters in a fashion enticing to game fish
  • Bendo – when you hang a fish
  • Billfish – Any several species of pelagic fish, including sailfish, spearfish, blue, black or white marlin, and swordfish
  • Bird – A device designed to splash around on the surface ahead of your trolled lure, imitating the disturbance caused by a shoal of baitfish See also teaser
  • Birdnest – A wad, tangle or snarl formed in the fishing line trapped under coils on the spool of a reel cause by overrunning the spool
  • Bit off – The fish bit through your line
  • Bite – When the angler feels that the fish bites or touches the bait
  • Bivalves – Molluscs that have a two valves
  • Bobber – Other name given to a fishing float in the U S
  • Boil – Surface disturbance caused by big fish chasing little fish
  • Boneheads – Bonito
  • Bones – Bonefish, bone-fish
  • Bottom Fish – Fish that spend most of their lives on bottom, such as cod, snapper, and grouper
  • Bottom fishing – Placing a baited hook in the sea bottom held in place by a weight
  • Bounce – Haul a fish over the rail without assistance
  • Brackish – Half salt water half fresh water the water where land and sea meet inshore water
  • Brail – to throw net fulls of chum at a time, also a kind of bait scoop
  • Break off – Term applied when the fishing line breaks and fish escapes
  • Breezers – Fish that are just swimming through the area Not necessarily feeding, just teasing
  • Bridge fishing – Fishing from, around or under the bridge
  • Broomstick – A short really stiff rod that has little or no bend, see “Grocery Rod”
  • Bucket Mouth – Usually what one would call a really big bass
  • Bucktail – A jigging lure comprising a metal head and fixed hook
  • Bull – Big Bull Red-fish, aka channel-bass
  • Bullet sinker – A weight made of lead or steel and shaped like a cone that slides up and down the fishing line
  • Butt pad – A cup attached to a waist belt warn around the front and used to take the load of the rod butt when catching larger fish
  • Butt Seat – A seat that is shaped in a sort of half moon design, which anglers often use to lean against while fishing Also known as “Bike” seats”
  • Buzz Bait – These “safety pin” wire lures for surface fishing have a propeller blade on one wire and a weighted body, skirt and hook on the other”
  • Buzz Saw – Getting cut off by another line crossing yours, person not following their fish, seen on many albacore and tuna trips
  • Candy – The “preferred” baitfish, usually live squid or shrimp
  • Captain”itis” – When a guy first gets his captains license and tries to talk and act like he knows everything
  • Casting – Throwing a fishing line into the water using a rod and reel
  • Casting Live Bait – Captain sees a fish afloat (Striped Marlin, Sailfish, Swordfish, Cobia, Triple-tail) and gets as close as possible in order to pitch live bait to the fish
  • Catch and release – Catching the fish and immediately release it State regulations required that some fish should be release immediately after caught
  • Cattle boat – An overcrowded open deck party boat
  • Caudal fin – The tail of a fish
  • Cephalopod – A type of marine creature that sports a set of tentacles, such as squid (calamari), cuttlefish (sepia) or octopus (pulpo)
  • Channel – It refers to a submerged water stream, a river channel or a waterway that connect two bodies of water and that is usually safe for navigation
  • Charter boat – boat used for hire and usually piloted by an experienced boat captain
  • Chartplotter – An electronic navigation system combining electronic charts and a GPS positioning system
  • Chaser – Is a lure with a hook at the end of a chain used when trolling
  • Chewed – Getting bit
  • Chewing – Fish are biting
  • Chicken – Small dorado
  • Chovies – Anchovies
  • Chum – Typically cut up pieces of fish thrown into the water to attract other fish
  • Chummer – Seasick person
  • Chumming – A fishing technique by which bait or scent is released into the water to attract fish to take a lure or baited hook Chum consists of live, dead, ground
  • Ciguatera – A toxin sometimes found in reef fish
  • Circle hook – Hook with a decreasing radius bend design, originally used by commercial fishermen because it requires no hook-set
  • Clarity – Deep or distance that we are able to see an object in the water
  • Coastal pelagic – An offshore fish that migrates along the coastline, but isn’t a true, ocean going pelagic Examples are kingfish, Spanish mackerel, cobia
  • Cocktail – Combining two or more baits on the hook
  • Coffee grinder – Open face spinning reel
  • Continental shelf – The area of relatively shallow water surrounding a land mass
  • Countdown lures – Lures that sink at a predetermined rate, for example 1ft per second This vital piece of data is normally marked on the lure packaging All the angler has to do is count from the time the lure hits the water
  • Cove – A small sheltered bay or inlet at a shore line
  • Crankbait – A fishing term describing a plug designed specifically for casting, that dives below the surface on the retrieve
  • Creel limit – As set by the state regulations is the number of fish that angles can keep or carry
  • Crimper – A tool used to compress the sleeves
  • Crustaceans – Shrimps, prawns, crabs, lobsters etc.
  • Cut Bait – Fish cut into chunks to fit the hook
  • Daisy chain – A trolling item this, comprising a string of decoy lures, only the end one of which contains a hook, the others acting as teasers
  • Dead Island – A Mythical Island you don”t want to visit
  • Depthfinder – An electronic instrument for measuring and displaying the depth of water beneath a boat
  • Desert – No fish seen for miles
  • Dikes – Side cutters and or pliar
  • Dinks – Undersized game fish
  • Dinos – Large sardines
  • Dip net – A net with a handle used to catch baitfish
  • Disgorger – A device used to remove the hook from a fish throat where is not possible to use the fingers
  • Dock – An American term for jetty or pontoon, for mooring a boat up to
  • Sea Dog – Seal
  • Doggie – Any member of the dogfish family
  • Dolphin – Mahi Mahi, Darado or chicken of the sea
  • Doormat – Large flounder or fluke
  • Downrigger – Used to slow troll most commonly used for kingfish and grouper Standard equipment on the kingfish tournament boats
  • Downrigger Ball – Cannonball
  • Downstream – Down current or down river
  • Drag – This could be referred to as the braking mechanism in your reel or the art of trolling, which is simply dragging lures behind the boat
  • Dragging – When the anchor doesn’t hold
  • Drift fishing – Fishing while drifting with the current
  • Drop off – A sudden increase in the depth of the sea bottom, pinnacles, canyons or channels
  • Drop the Hook – Set the anchor
  • Dropper – A short hook link attached above a weight or lure
  • Dropper Loop – The “dropper loop” is a name for the type of knot used on multiple hook setups
  • Ebb tide – A falling tide
  • Egg Sinker – A sliding sinker shaped like an egg
  • Electronics – Commonly refers to the depth finders, and fish finders used by anglers
  • Express – Large lower helm area with marlin or tuna towers
  • Eyelets – The line guides on the fishing rod
  • FAD – A Fish Aggregation Device, a floating platform under which fish congregate, used by commercial fisherman
  • Farmer – One who constantly loses fish
  • Fathom – Six feet of depth Many nautical charts are marked in fathoms, not feet
  • Feeding times – The times of the day when fish feeds and is more active Experienced angles associate the position of the sun and the moon with the fish behavior and the feeding times
  • Fighting Belt – A belt worn around the waist that incorporates a plastic cup to hold the butt of a fishing rod, to make the job of fighting an landing a big fish a little less painful on the angler
  • Fighting Chair – Mounted in the center of the cockpit to assist in fighting big fish
  • Fillet – Method used to separate the portions of flesh from the bony skeleton of the fish for human consumption
  • Fire Tiger – Color scheme that involves a lure with green back, chartreuse sides, orange belly and black vertical lines on the sides
  • Firecrackers – Small Yellow-tail
  • Fishfinder – An electronic device used to detect fish and display their distribution on a screen
  • Fishing gear – Is the fishing equipment used by anglers and commonly known as tackle
  • Fishing line – These lines have the qualities of being able to stretch more and last longer than other types of lines
  • Fishing lures – Bait designed to look like a fish that moves and vibrates to attract the fish
  • Fishing reels – The fishing reel is a cylindrical gadget or device attached to the fishing rod and is use for winding and gathering up the fishing line
  • Fishing rod – Fishing rods are normally made of fiber glass, graphite, carbon fiber, bamboo and stainless steel Fishing rods are identified by their weight and length
  • Fishing techniques – These are the methods used by the anglers for catching fish, some fishing techniques are angling, spear fishing, trapping, hand gathering, netting, commercial fishing, recreational fishing Fishing techniques and varied depend on many factors, targeting species behavior, locations, and the anglers knowledge
  • Flapper – A method of preparing a dead baitfish where the fish is filleted on both sides up to the head and the backbone removed This leaves the fillets attached to the head, allowing them to flap around in the current leaving an intense scent trail
  • Flats – Shallow expansive areas
  • Flats Fishing – Flats or backcountry fishing, or fishing the back country flats is a terminology used throughout South Florida and the Keys to mention the art of fishing in the shallow and not to deep waters of areas near the shore line’s where abundant species of fish (coastal fish) live and reproduce at all times Flat fishing is not a complicated and easy to learn Also inshore fishing
  • Flattie – A member of the flatfish family
  • Float – Also called a “bobber”, these suspend hooked bait off of the bottom, and signal hits by “bobbing” when a fish takes the bait”
  • Flotsam – Any debris that has washed offshore
  • Flood tide – A rising tide
  • Florida rigging – Florida Rig
  • Fluorocarbon – A material composed of a bond between fluorine and carbon atoms Fishing line manufactured of this material can take a lot of damage without losing strength, as to monofilament, which is compromised by even the smallest nick In addition, it has a faster sink rate for it”s diameter than mono The raw material has a lower light reaction index than water This has lead manufacturers to claim that fluorocarbon is less visible than mono filament
  • Fly fishing – Fishing or angling with and artificial fly for bait as a lure
  • Flybridge – Cabin at cockpit level with 1 helm station above Tuna Tower adds second helm station
  • Flying bridge – A permanent raised steering platform on an offshore sport-fishing boat From this elevated platform, the captain has a better view of everything, including the trolling baits and any approaching fish
  • Flying gaff – A long handled gaff with a detachable head tied to a rope
  • Foaming – Lots of big fish feeding heavily upon lots of little fish The top-water disturbance is so great it creates a “foam” on top of the water
  • Footballs – Little tuna
  • Free gaff – To gaff a fish that is not hooked
  • Free spool – The reel that allows the line to be feed without drag or any resistance
  • Fresh Dead – If no live squid, fresh dead squid is second best
  • Fried – Burned up the reel’s drag washers
  • Fry – Young fish, or a cooking method for fish of any age
  • Gaff – A steel hook on a handle used for landing fish
  • Game fish – Marine fish pursued by anglers for recreational or sport fishing
  • Gastropods – Marine snails and slugs
  • Gear – Fishing gear
  • Gear ratio – The relationship between the number of times a reel spool turns for each revolution of the handle
  • Gigging – The noble art of creeping up on unsuspecting flatfish in shallow water, and stabbing them with a pointed stick Keeping a low profile is unlikely to be a successful survival strategy for the fish
  • Gill – The breathing organ of a fish that extracts oxygen from the water
  • GPS – Global Positioning Satellite, device used to accurately determine your location with in feet Handy for finding your way on unfamiliar lakes
  • Gunwhale – Pronounced “gunnel” The upper outside edge of a boat”s hull along each side See also “Transom”
  • Handline – The simplest rig of all No rod or reel, just a line with a hook at one end and an angler at the other end
  • Handlining – Not just using a hand-line, but also the technique of getting a large fish to the boat when no further line can be wound onto the reel
  • Head pin – The short length of wire pushed through the head of a bait-fish as part of the procedure of rigging it for trolling
  • Head spike – See head pin
  • Hokkai – A string of small shrimp
  • Honey hole – Term used to describing a particular good fishing spot or area where only you know the location
  • Hook – A metal wire device shaped like a “J” with an opening or “eye” at one end to which the line is tied and a point at the other end to catch the fish Circle hooks have an angled point Double and treble hooks have two or three points, respectively”
  • IGFA – The International Game Fishing Association
  • Inshore fishing – A fishing term generally used to describe fishing that takes place within sight of land
  • Invertebrate – Any animal that doesn’t have a backbone; a term often found in sentences containing the word “politician”
  • Jellyworm – A soft plastic lure designed to imitate a swimming marine worm, often a rag-worm
  • Jerkbait – A type of lure resembling a bait fish that is typically fished in a series of quick jerks to resemble a darting baitfish
  • Jig – Sometimes called “buck-tails”, an artificial lure designed primarily to be fished vertically in the water column, a method known as jigging Not to be confused with a drunken sailor”s attempt at dancing “
  • Jig fishing – Jigging vertically
  • Jigging – A vertical presentation where a lure is worked up and down (rather than laterally) through the water column
  • Keeper – Typically any legal fish that is worth taking home
  • Kite Rig – Fishing a bait with a kite. Fishing kites are different from land kites, usually flat and square. The live bait skips around on the surface, without the telltale line being visible. Used mostly on sailfish, but effective on other species
  • Lanyard – A short length of rope or a strap used to secure an item and prevent its loss
  • Leader – A length of mono-filament, wire or other stranded material tied between the end of the line and the lure or hook Leaders provide extra strength or abrasion resistance from the rough mouth and teeth of fish (pike, barracuda, sharks), scales (sharks), gill covers (tarpon and snook), blows from tails (tuna)
  • Leadhead – A lure comprising a metal head and fixed hook, to which soft
  • Ledger – A fishing term describing a bottom fishing rig incorporating a sliding weight
  • Lever drag – A mechanism that actuates drag adjustment through a lever on top of the reel, rather than by a rotating a drag star on the handle main shaft (star drag) Lever drags were first introduced on big game reels and have recently been added to lighter application reels
  • Line – Specialized “string” used for fishing Nylon monofilament line is the most popular Other lines are made of different materials, including braided fibers and wire FLY-LINE is a specialized line made of a plastic coating on a core, and often made tapered (changing diameter) to make fly casting easier (To preserve good fishing, take any discarded line with you when you leave Discarded line can snag and harm wildlife, and kill fish, turtles, frogs, birds and small mammals)”
  • Line guides – The rings through which the fishing line passes on the fishing rod
  • Lit up – Pelagic fish such as the marlins, sailfish and wahoo have a tendency to “light up” with neon, powder blue colors when excited or hooked”
  • Live Bait Well – See “Live-well”
  • Live Well – A circulating well to keep bait fish alive all day
  • Livebox – A box where live baitfish or caught fish is kept
  • Livewell – Compartment in a boat designed to hold water and keep fish alive Typically have some device for recirculating water
  • Locators – Common nickname for depth finders since they often display images of fish as they pass over them
  • Longliner – As seen in the movie, The Perfect Storm, long-liners are commercial fishing boats with a huge spool of heavy monofilament line on their back deck, up to 40 miles long Used mostly for targeting Tuna and Swordfish
  • Lunker – Big fish
  • Lure – Any artificial item designed to attract fish and fitted with hooks These include flies, hard plastic or wood lures (or plugs), soft plastic imitations, large offshore skirted baits, metal spoons, lead
  • Mainline – The main line that”s on your reel, that”s tied to your leader
  • Mantle – The body part of a squid from which the head and tentacles emerge
  • Marker buoy – Used in fishing to mark the location of a large school of fish in open water
  • Migration route – The pass fallowed by the fish when migrating from one location to another
  • Molluscs – Invertebrate animals that include clams, mussels, and oysters (bivalves), snails and slugs (gastropods), and cuttlefish, squids, and octopuses (cephalopods)
  • Mono – Monofilament fishing line
  • Mono leader – Leader made of monofilament, mono leaders are of course heavier grade than the line on your reel Standard mono leader for huge marlin, for instance, is 300
  • Monofilament – Common reference to a synthetic polymer fishing line extruded as a single filament
  • Moon Phase – Experienced angles know and study the action of the moon over the marine species
  • Natural bait – Live or dead hook bait
  • Neap tides – The bottom end of tidal ranges, with the smallest difference between daily high and low water marks Neap tides occur every 28 days, 14 days after spring tides, with a direct correlation to the phase of the moon
  • Offshore fishing – A fishing term generally used to describe fishing that takes place out of sight of land
  • Old Salt – Some crusty old fisherman who has survived many storms offshore, and seen by many fish
  • Operculum – The gill-cover of a fish
  • Outrigger – Is a pole or devise used to keep the fishing lines from tangling when using the method of fishing called trolling in which one or more fishing lines are thrown behind a moving boat
  • Over fishing – Fishing without caring for the fish population
  • Paravane – A plastic device designed to dive when dragged through the water Used instead of a weight when trolling, to fish the lure at increased depth
  • Party Boat – A large ocean charter fishing vessel
  • Pectoral fin – The fin usually found on each side of the body immediately aft of the gill cover
  • Pelagic – The fish of the open ocean, not resident to any specific area or feature
  • Pelvic fin – The pair of fins on the belly of a fish, between the pectoral fins and the anal fin
  • Pennel Rig – A two hook rig for long baits like marine worms, and large baits such as whole squid
  • PFD – A personal floatation device that all anglers should wear when there”s half a chance they might fall in
  • Planer – A para-vane on steroids, normally fashioned in stainless steel
  • Plastics – In general, lures manufactured from flexible vinyl and poly carbonate derivatives
  • Plug – A hard wooden or plastic lure
  • Polarized glasses – A very necessary part of a fly fisherman”s kit By virtue of a “grill” of tiny bars, sandwiched between two layers of glass, polarized glasses eliminate glare reflected from water and allow a fisherman to see into the water”
  • Popper – Top-water plug with a dished lip that makes a commotion
  • Possession limit – The maximum limit or amount of fish that a person can possess at one time
  • Predator – A fish that preys on other fish
  • Prey – A fish that would be well advised to stay clear of predators
  • Pro – Elite fishermen who make a living from fishing
  • Pulley Rig – A shore casting rig designed to reduce tackle losses when fishing over rough ground
  • Pulpit – In boat fishing terms, this is the rail around the fore-deck where it will prevent people
  • Quick Release – (QR) Clip
  • Reef fish – Fish that lives near or in the ecosystem of the coral reefs
  • Reel – A mechanical device for holding and spooling fishing line Reels have a line spool, brake to slow running fish, handle to retrieve line and foot for clamping to a rod
  • Rig Body Line – The main length of line used in your rig, to which the hook snoods are attached
  • Rocket Launcher – A rack of tubes designed to hold five or six fishing rods in a boat, easily accessible and protective from damage in rough seas
  • Rod – A long lever, usually made of fiberglass, graphite or composite materials and used to catch fish Different types are available, such as rods for spinning, fly fishing, spin-cast, bait casting, boat fishing offshore trolling, surf fishing, jetty and pier fishing
  • Rod Belt – A leather or plastic belt that fits around an angler”s waist while fighting a fish The belt socket keeps the rod but snug, and saves weary arm muscles and that lower back during a long fight
  • Roller Guide – A type of line guide on a fishing rod which incorporates a roller to reduce friction when under high load
  • Rotten Bottom – A weak link connecting a sacrificial sinker that will break when you get hung up, thus minimizing the loss to your tackle Not just a fishing term, but also a condition associated with a good night in the pub, particularly when followed by a hot curry
  • Run & Gun – Method of fishing where the angler is only attempting to catch those aggressive fish that will quickly strike the lures cast Then the angler “runs” or motors to the next spot”
  • Sabikis – A string of small lures on individual snoods used to catch bait-fish
  • Salt Water Regulations – Salt water fishing is regulated to avoid over fishing and protect our ecosystem, get familiar with these regulations to ensure you a good fishing experience and no complications
  • Sand spike – A rod holder pushed deep into the sand to support a surf rod or beach-casting rod vertically
  • Seamounts – A seamount is a mountain rising from the ocean floor that doesn’t reach the water”s surface Sort of an island that didn’t quite make it
  • Secondary Port – any port which is not a Standard Port, but for which tidal data can be derived by reference to a Standard Port
  • Shad – A small soft bait fish
  • Shoal – A submerged bar, bank or ridge
  • Shock Leader – A short but heavy piece of mono filament, attached to the hook, designed to take the shock of hard strike And the resulting abrasion from sharp teeth or bottom scraping
  • Shore – land
  • Short strike – Fish hits the lure but misses it short
  • Sight fishing – Method of angling, where fishermen can actually see the fish they are attempting to catch Requires clear water
  • SIK – Sit Inside Kayak
  • Sink and draw – During lure fishing the rod is slowly raised during retrieval and thrown back, the lure appears to be a wounded fish using this method
  • Sinker – A weight of lead or other metals designed to sink a hooked bait or lure
  • Size limit – Legal size of the fish caught Refer to
  • Skiff – Small inshore boat normally 16″ or less
  • Skirt – Silicone, rubber or plastic material fashioned around a spinner-bait or similar lure to create the body
  • Skirted lure – A trolling lure designed to imitate a squid or octopus
  • Skunked – To catch zero fish or keepers
  • Slack line – The loose section of line in between the tip of the rod and the lure
  • Slack water – The period at top or bottom of the tide when the tidal stream has no strength or direction
  • Sleeves – Line crimps
  • Snap – A small device similar to a dog leash snap, tied to the line and used for attachment and quick release of hooks, rigs and lures
  • Snap link – A swivel with a clip attached used for securing other rig components such as casting weights
  • Snelled hook – A hook with the line tied around its shank rather than to its eye
  • Snubber – A shock leader
  • Soft Plastic Lures – Made of a soft plastic to resemble a worm, lizard, crayfish, shrimp or generic wiggling creature Often sold in bulk to be rigged on hooks by the angler
  • SOK – Sit On Top Kayak
  • Speed trolling – Trolling plastic bill-fish baits up to 20 miles an hour
  • Spinner – Spinner blades rotate around the straight wire shaft of these weighted
  • Spinner-bait – An artificial bait consisting of a lead-head and one or two rotating blades, and a shaft dressed with a skirt
  • Spinning reel – The most popular fishing-reel in the world
  • Split shot – Small weights squeezed onto the line, used with light float tackle
  • Spoon – A metal lure designed to wobble and flutter, rather than rotate like a spinner
  • Sport fishing – Sport fishing competitions take place in the Florida Keys very often but the term sport fishing does not only apply to competition, any form of angling for recreational proposes is considered by many as sport fishing
  • Sport-fishing Boat – A type of fast fishing boat of 24ft (8m) or more designed for offshore fishing
  • Spreader bar – An array of soft artificials
  • Spring tides – The top end of tidal ranges, with the greatest difference between daily high and low water marks Spring tides occur every 28 days, 14 days after neap tides, with a direct correlation to the phase of the moon, also called “King-tides”
  • Standard Port – Any one of a number of ports around the coast for which tidal data is published
  • Standup Tackle – Short rod and stout reel, hooked up to a harness that the angler wears The harness offers good back support and helps support the heavy tackle
  • Stinger – A secondary hook, intended to catch short strikes
  • Strike – Any “hit” by a fish taking a lure or bait
  • Stromboid toxin – A form of poisoning caused by eating fish that has started to turn bad
  • Structure – Reference to bottom of contours and submerged natural and man made features, such as old road beds and drop offs These features serve as travel routes and habitat for fish
  • Surfcasting – Casting a lure or a baited hook from the beach or a rocky shore
  • Swells – Offshore waves that may be generated thousands of miles away Usually easier to navigate than wave chop, which is steeper and much more frequent Swells generally become a problem when they near land, as their height increases
  • Swim Bait – Soft plastic lure that resembles a baitfish
  • Swim Bladder – An internal organ in a fish that enables it to stay put at its chosen depth
  • Swimbaits – Soft artificial bait meant to mimic natural movements
  • Swimming lures – Sinking plugs designed to resemble a swimming baitfish Such plugs vibrate or wobble during retrieve
  • Swivel – A small device with two or more eyes (rings) a central swiveling part They are used between a lure or leader and line to prevent line twist Otherwise, line twist can occur when a revolving lure twists line to cause tangles
  • Tackle – Is the equipment used for fishing, hook, lines, floats, reels, lures, baits, traps, spears, rods, gaffs are considered tackle Terminal tackle is the gear attached to the end of the fishing line; tackle box is where the angler keeps the gear
  • Tackle Box – A box or bag with special compartments and features to hold terminal tackle, lures, hooks, and other fishing gear
  • Taff Rail – The rail around the stern of any boat, not just Welsh ones, also referred to as the push-pit
  • Tag end – Extra line at the end of the knot normally cut off for neatness
  • Tailing – Redfish bottom feeding or “grubbing” with its tail fin out of the water
  • Teaser – Any device designed to attract fish to your lure, and induce them to strike
  • Terminal Tackle – A general term for describing bobbers, sinkers, hooks, rigs, snaps, swivels and other gear used at the end of a line
  • Tidal Range – The difference in height between Low Water and the next High Water At its maximum at the top of spring tides and its minimum at bottom of neap tides
  • Top Water Lure – Lures made of hard plastic, wood, hollow rubber/plastic and designed to float on the surface to attract fish when twitched or moved
  • Transom – The upper outside edge of a boat”s hull across the stern See also “Gun-whale”
  • Trolling – When we trail a baited line to catch fish from behind a moving boat or vessel, or to be more precise, trolling is a popular method of fishing behind a moving boat
  • Trolling Artificials – Several fishing lines in the water with artificial lures of various sizes & colors
  • Trolling ball – A spherical lead weight for getting your trolling line down deeper, normally used as part of a down-rigger set
  • Trolling plug – Saltwater trolling plugs have stout hooks and a big lip for deep diving Designed for king-fish, wahoo, tuna, and, on Florida”s Coastal Bend area on the Gulf, for gag grouper
  • Trolling Spoon – A large spoon that is trailed, or trolled, behind a boat to catch fish
  • Tube Bait – Made of soft plastic, these tubular lures are fished with special weighted hooks inserted into the hollow body
  • Tuna tower – Elevated driving platform that allows a better view of surrounding water in rolling seas Also gives the captain a better view of the trolling spread to detect game-fish approaching a lure
  • Tuna Tubes – Salt Water is forced upward through to tube to keep small tuna alive Live Tuna are the preferred bait for big fish
  • Waypoint – A GPS position marked on an electronic chart, often as a planned course change on a route, or as an event marker
  • Weedless – Lures made with a fixed hook guard for fishing heavy weeds preventing snagging
  • Weedline – In saltwater, normally made up of floating yellow sargassum weed, created when two offshore currents flow together A solid weed-line is a unique environment inhabited with all sorts of small juvenile fish and the predators that feed on them
  • Wire Leader – Any of several kinds of leader with steel content for toothy critters

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